Between Riverside and Crazy

Hurry Up and Become a Fuckin’ Man

I once saw Stephen Adly Guirgis speak at the 92Y, with Tony Kushner moderating a discussion on Arthur Miller.  He prefaced his praise for Mr. Kushner (“I don’t mean to suck your dick or anything…”) by noting that he was missing a Rangers playoff game to be there, which is a good indication of the tone of…

Qualification of Douglas Evans

First You Take a Drink…

Derek Ahonen writes terrific first acts.  His newest work, The Qualification of Douglas Evans, follows its eponymous protagonist (Mr. Ahonen) for thirty years, from the child of an alcoholic father to the bright-eyed acting student fresh off the bus to New York City and finally to the bitter alcoholic himself, destroying relationships with a series of women while…

The Long Shrift

The Word “Rape” Dropped About Carelessly

Richard (Scott Haze) is yanked out of high school and sent to a violent prison when he’s accused of rape by a rich, pretty, popular classmate. Five years into his nine-year sentence, Richard is released after the girl recants. He returns home to attend a high school reunion, drawn by an invitation from a woman…

Enter at Forest Lawn

The Island of Misfit Sociopaths

“My love to Tovah,” producer Jack Story (Mark Roberts) barks into the phone at the end of the conversation that opens Enter at Forest Lawn.  The “conversation” is more of a monologue, an extended tirade into a hands-free telephone about Jack’s “hateful cunt” of a wife, a “maniacal bush-pig” who has left his asshole “drippin’ black blood.”…

Arrivals & Departures

Private Fears in Private Places

Towards the end of Arrivals & Departures, Alan Ayckbourn’s seventy-seventh play (the author is seventy-five), the military handler Ez (Elizabeth Boag) tells Barry (Kim Wall), the man she is handling, that they have nothing in common.  “We’ll never know now, will we?” Barry asks, a line that epitomizes Mr. Ayckbourn’s central concern.  In the main action of Arrivals…