Reviews

The Lord of Misrule

Azdak (Christopher Lloyd) is a difficult character.  As played by Mr. Lloyd—with a bright, shining bald head, a Neanderthal’s brow, and Dumbo ears—he looks like a man who got lost, and who was perhaps mauled by several rabid dogs, on his way to the set of The Hills Have Eyes.  Azdak is the backbone, if […]

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Reviews

You Might Even End Up Happy

“I had a love/hate relationship with Mr. Ibsen for a long time,” admits director Andre Belgrader, while one of his actors, Wrenn Schmidt, adds, “The first time I read The Master Builder, there was nothing about that play that attracted me to it.”  Though both eventually came around to the author and his work, the […]

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Reviews

Thou of Thyself Thy Sweet Self Dost Deceive

Setting Macbeth in an insane asylum is not an entirely original idea—after all, Sleep No More has been running just twenty blocks south of the Barrymore Theatre for over two years—but apart from adding an irrelevant, “creepy” aesthetic, I’m sure I don’t know why anyone would do this to Shakespeare’s play.  In its newest incarnation, […]

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Reviews

If I Get Busted in New York, the Freest City in the World…

Nathan Lane has one of the most interesting faces in showbusiness: his thick black eyebrows seem to almost always be forming an upside down V, giving the impression of endless mirth, while his Mr. Potato Head shaped face is so elastic his muscles may as well be made of rubber bands.  Which makes him the […]

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Reviews

Now It Came to Pass

“I’m speaking English?” asks Loyfer (Shane Baker) at the opening of The Megile of Itzik Manger.  Then, looking at an elderly member of the audience, he says, I’m guessing, “From now on—in Yiddish,” for the supertitles had not yet started.  Wearing a purple pinstripe suit and a top hat, and with the ease and charisma […]

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Reviews

Barrie’s Women

If only there were ten more theaters like the Pearl, New York would be in great shape.  Their most recent production, This Side of Neverland, combines two J.M. Barrie one-acts, “Rosalind” and “The Twelve Pound Look.”  Barrie was one of those authors, like Maurice Sendak, who understood that childhood is far more complicated and melancholy […]

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Reviews

Et cetera

Neil LaBute has always struck me as occasionally nastily observant but mostly just plain nasty, though his play Some Girl(s), currently running at the Chain Theatre, suffers more from endless tedium than anything else; “predictably shocking” is an oxymoron, and once you figure out what Mr. LaBute is up to, he loses about ninety percent […]

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