Reviews

This Bit of Meat

Sea Wall and A Life, a pair of monologues currently running back-to-back at the Hudson Theatre, are small, quiet plays. In Simon Stephens’ Sea Wall, a photographer Alex (Tom Sturridge) tells stories about his father-in-law and his daughter; in Nick Payne’s A Life, Abe (Jake Gyllenhaal) oscillates between narrating his own father’s death and his […]

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Reviews

I Know Why the Caged Bird Slays

When they first meet, Jason (Alex Hernandez) confuses Medea (Sabina Zúñiga Varela) for a bird, “El Guaco” or “the laughing falcon.” Likewise, when the audience first sees her, she is flapping a pair of large banana palms, like the guaco ready to take flight. But the comparison is misleading: in Luis Alfaro’s Mojada, an adaptation […]

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Reviews

Anger’s My Meat—I Sup upon Myself

Coriolanus (Jonathan Cake) is Shakespeare’s most baffling protagonist, an ornery Roman general who seethes with contempt for both the political elite and the commoners. After the conquest of a Volscian city, Coriolanus returns home and briefly runs for consul. But he refuses to participate in symbolic gestures of respect for the plebeians and is summarily […]

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Reviews

Watch Your Language

Dogg’s Hamlet, Cahoot’s Macbeth, which originally premiered in 1979, continues Tom Stoppard’s longstanding fascination with restaging Shakespeare. While not quite as rewarding as Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, the work is playful, intelligent, and—if staged properly—utterly terrifying. The first act has a group of kids speaking a nonsense language called “Dogg.” The script provides a […]

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Reviews

Theater Plays

The backbone of the Potomac Theatre Project’s Havel: The Passion of Thought—performed in repertory with Tom Stoppard’s Dogg’s Hamlet, Cahoot’s Macbeth—are three interlinked one-acts by the dissident writer (and later President of the Czech Republic) Václav Havel. All were originally banned in his native country. In the first, Interview, Ferdinand Vaněk (David Barlow), a writer […]

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Reviews

Divisible by Three

With her slight form, her raspy voice, and her bouncy movements, April Matthis owns the stage. Playing the title character in Lydia R. Diamond’s Toni Stone, Matthis weaves effortlessly through space and time to reconstruct the story of the first woman to play professional baseball. The transitions are simple—”I’m a little girl,” Matthis will say […]

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