Reviews

Watch Your Language

Dogg’s Hamlet, Cahoot’s Macbeth, which originally premiered in 1979, continues Tom Stoppard’s longstanding fascination with restaging Shakespeare. While not quite as rewarding as Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, the work is playful, intelligent, and—if staged properly—utterly terrifying. The first act has a group of kids speaking a nonsense language called “Dogg.” The script provides a […]

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Reviews

Tomorrow Is For Forgetting the Bad Things of Today

Kelechi (Mfoniso Udofia), a bestselling Pulitzer Prize finalist, returns home to Nigeria after a fifteen-year absence.  Her father, Godwin (Oberon K.A. Adjepong), is dying, and her agent is haranguing her about the next book: maybe something about “war time in Africa”?  Riddled with anxiety and depression—which is somehow linked to this place—she struggles through interactions […]

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Reviews

When Wick and Oil Are Clean

Long before we learn that Ellis (William Apps) has an estranged daughter, a terrible secret, and a real thing about lamps, we know something is off. We see him nervously fussing about his apartment, a sizing sticker still attached to his pants, a hastily forgotten stick of deodorant wedged in the couch cushions. Ellis is […]

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Reviews

Voicing Ghosts

Ghosts hover in the wings of two short plays by David Mamet, “Prairie du Chien” and “The Shawl,” currently paired on Atlantic Stage 2.  In “Prairie du Chien,” a raconteur (Jordan Lage) passes the time on a train by telling the story of a man who murdered his wife and hanged himself after discovering her affair with […]

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Reviews

The Winning Post’s No End

How does one go about faulting the director in a play full of quality acting? Is Leah C. Gardiner heavily complicit in the performances that save The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner from sheer mediocrity? Or did the actors, like the play’s protagonist, rise up against the restrictive desires of their supervisors?

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Reviews

The Absence of Desire

Howard Barker is a sixty-four-year-old enfant terrible.  He is a playwright who does not believe in collaboration, who has no interest in sympathetic characters, and who dismisses politics in theater.  And he is ruthlessly attached to the idea that “a good play puts the audience through a certain ordeal” while a good author “produce[s] a […]

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Reviews

I Think the Eighties Are Going to Be Stupendous

“There are 10^11 stars in the galaxy.  That used to be a huge number.  But it’s only a hundred billion.  It’s less than the national deficit!  We used to call them astronomical numbers.  Now we should call them economical numbers.” – Richard Feynman

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