Reviews

A Game of Squash Isn’t Simply a Game of Squash

The stage design is minimal to the extreme. More often than not, the actors speak facing outward rather than one another. When they do face each other, they stand on opposite sides of the stage, perhaps twenty feet apart. When only two are in a scene, the third remains hovering around the corners of the […]

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Reviews

At Least Father Horrigan Is Going to Hell

In his condition-of-England play, Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth drew in broad strokes: not only does he set the action on St. George’s Day, but he begins with a dreamy, mostly-accurate recitation from the Blake, courtesy of a fifteen-year-old girl, dressed as Phaedra and interrupted after two stanzas.  Still, Jerusalem worked, and phenomenally so, because Butterworth largely earned his […]

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Reviews

An Irksome Angel Rests Atop The Mountaintop

Katori Hall begins The Mountaintop by taking a man whose face is plastered all over New York City, a man who is compared to Jesus and Gandhi and who has just biblically bellowed before his final audience, “I’ve seen the Promised Land … Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord,” and presenting […]

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