Reviews

Friends, Romans, Fellow Grocers

Over the next few years, I imagine there will be a revival of interest in The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui, Brecht’s roman à clef about a Chicago gangster who represents Hitler during his rise to power.  We’ll probably see more productions of An Enemy of the People, too, as well as The Crucible and Julius Caesar.  Trump, unfortunately, […]

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Reviews

Bloody Aprons and Yellow Dresses

In Fucking A, flesh is inseparable from its economic value, often bearing wounds that remind its owners of past transactions: the First Lady (Elizabeth Stanley) of this unnamed town is desperate to conceive as her family’s money is no longer enough to keep her husband, the Mayor (Marc Kudisch), in her bed, but her “pussy is […]

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Reviews

Is This It, Sir? History?

Just as William Snelgrave (Gordon Joseph Weiss) and his wife, Darcy (Concetta Tomei), are nearing the end of their quarantine, two interlopers break into their home and the clock resets.  It’s 1665, the year of the Great Plague that would kill almost one quarter of London’s population.  King Charles II and his family have fled […]

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Reviews

It Staggers to Its Feet Again

I’m not an expert on Congolese music, but I’m pretty sure it doesn’t sound like Spring Awakening—and this is essentially the problem with Brian Kulick’s staging of Mother Courage and Her Children, which ingeniously transplants Brecht’s play from seventeenth-century Europe to modern-day Congo but does little to establish the space beyond the vague gestures associated with the Africa of the American imagination.  That […]

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Reviews

The Shark Has Lost Its Teeth

It is difficult to say whether Brecht has dated, whether he was never really all that good in the first place, or whether he is just very, very difficult to stage well.  The Foundry Theatre’s recent production of Good Person of Szechwan was a revelation, but it leaves one wondering if any production by that […]

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Reviews

Grub First, Then Ethics

“Alienation” does not always mean “unpleasantness,” and yet that is the general consensus among lousy directors of Brecht.  For these people, if it’s fun, it’s not being done right.  What a delightful revelation, then, to discover the Foundry Theatre’s Good Person of Szechwan.  This is a carnival of a production that, as the playwright dictates, is […]

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