Reviews

The Bloody Sequel

Like Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Tom Stoppard’s adaptation of Hamlet that stages the action of the play from the perspective of the prince’s childhood friends, Taylor Mac’s Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus locates the drama in supporting characters.  The eponymous Gary (Nathan Lane) is a clown who has been promoted to maid and dreams of one day becoming […]

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Reviews

Win—or Die

Les Liaisons Dangereuses is one of the great art works of the twentieth century.  Cynical and sentimental, personal and political, every line drips with subtext, and each moment is written with the same precision that the two principals, Marquise de Merteuil (Janet McTeer) and Vicomte de Valmont (Liev Schreiber), bring to their games of sexual conquest.

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Reviews

Too Much Steel and Stone

The night clerk (Frank Wood) of a seedy midtown hotel is already onstage as the audience enters the Booth Theatre.  His eyes glassy, he stares off at nothing in particular.  An “Out of Order” sign hangs on the birdcage elevator.  When Hughie begins, the hotel wakes up, its neon sing flashing to life outside and the […]

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Reviews

God Listens to Slayer

It is pretty common, especially in Shakespearean productions, for actors to double up on parts.  In Fiasco’s Cymbeline, or in Bedlam’s Saint Joan, some members of the cast would hop back and forth between roles in the same scene, using only minor costume changes to indicate the difference.  But I have never seen anything quite like Robert […]

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Reviews

Happy Mother’s Day

Eric Coble received his MFA in acting from Ohio University, but his new play, The Velocity of Autumn, is almost a perfect example of the type of work that comes out of contemporary writing programs.  It is sharp, well-written, and has an immaculate sense of form.  On the other hand, it is unsurprising and timid; any attempts to […]

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Reviews

The Play About the Babies

A writer for Vanity Fair once declared that Lolita was “the only convincing love story of our century,” perhaps because he had not yet seen Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?  George (Tracy Letts) and Martha (Amy Morton) have spent a lifetime playing games—Humiliate the Host, for example, or Hump the Hostess—verbally whipping each […]

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Reviews

Change at the Dinner Table

Brooke Wyeth (Rachel Griffiths) complains that her family never talks about anything, though you’d never know it from Other Desert Cities, a play so laden with expository monologues and near-endless confessions that it leaves its audience crying out for the subtlety of Neil LaBute.  This monster of a production, which runs for over two hours […]

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