Reviews

Spit Thy Poison

Founded in 2003, the Red Bull Theater has long been a space space for the Jacobean playwrights who are often ignored by revival companies in favor of their precedessor, Shakespeare.  In recent years, the company has added contemporary works to its roster, including Loot and The Mystery of Irma Vep, but it is nice to […]

Read more
Reviews

It’s Amazing How Well We Get Along, All Things Considered

If nothing else, the Gingold Theatrical Group has done us a great service in producing this version of George Bernard Shaw’s Heartbreak House.  The play, inspired by Chekhov, was begun in 1913 and rewritten before its publication in 1919 and its premiere in 1920.  Director David Staller has attempted to resurrect an earlier, darker take on the […]

Read more
Reviews

Pshaw!

The School for Scandal is a kind of opera buffa version of Les Liaisons dangereuses—and in fact, only six years separate Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s play (1776) from Pierre Choderlos de Laclos’ novel (1782).  But where the comedy in Laclos is devastating, in Sheridan it is forgiving: the gossip-mongers who dominate his stage are toothless, equal-opportunity offenders, and most are […]

Read more
Reviews

The Way to the Future

During the mid-sixties, the Holocaust was very much on American minds. This wasn’t always the case. At the end of World War II and the beginning of the Cold War, Germany (or West Germany) flipped from foe to friend faster than you could say Zyklon B. American Jews, hesitant to criticize this now-ally and be […]

Read more
Reviews

Her Sickness Is a Fullness of Her Blood

When Declan Donnellan directed ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore at BAM three years ago, he stripped the play of everything but its core plot—the incestuous and ultimately fatal affair between Giovanni (Matthew Amendt) and his sister Annabella (Amelia Pedlow)—and the result was cinematic, highly stylized, and saturated with melodrama. In a new revival by Jesse Berger, John Ford’s […]

Read more
Reviews

People Hurt Me—So I Hurt Them Back

“It is a curious subject of observation and inquiry,” writes Nathaniel Hawthorne in The Scarlet Letter, “whether hatred and love be not the same thing at bottom.”  This certainly seems to be the case in August Strindberg’s The Dance of Death, a brutal exercise in misanthropy during which an elderly military captain, Edgar (Daniel Davis), […]

Read more