Reviews

A Man Is What He Has

Ayad Akhtar’s last play, The Invisible Hand, skewered market capitalism by demonstrating how even the most ideologically resistant—in that case, Islamic terrorists—can fall prey to its seduction.  Now, in Junk, he returns to the same subject, but this time his focus is on the scene of the crime itself: Wall Street in the mid-1980s, when debt was […]

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Reviews

Pshaw!

The School for Scandal is a kind of opera buffa version of Les Liaisons dangereuses—and in fact, only six years separate Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s play (1776) from Pierre Choderlos de Laclos’ novel (1782).  But where the comedy in Laclos is devastating, in Sheridan it is forgiving: the gossip-mongers who dominate his stage are toothless, equal-opportunity offenders, and most are […]

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Reviews

Just by Looking

Doug Wright has clearly done his research.  His new play Posterity, about the meeting of Henrik Ibsen (John Noble) and Gustav Vigeland (Hamish Linklater), is full of assurance about its subjects.  Based on a true story, the young Vigeland, considered one of Norway’s greatest sculptors (he designed the Nobel Peace Prize medal), is offered an assignment: […]

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Reviews

Starving on Dissonances

“Thank you for coming,” an old man says.  “For using your presence as a vote, if you will, that before we are dead in the ground, being in a room together is valuable.  I won’t say important—there’s no need to be ridiculous—but valuable.”  The man is the modernist composer Charles Ives (Henry Stram), and it’s […]

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