Reviews

Dream Brother, My Killer, My Lover

There are, as I see it, two obstacles to a theatrical adaptation of Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange: the first, and most important, is to make sure that Nadsat, the Joycean, English/Russian hybrid slang he invented for his teenaged characters, is clearly understood.  All those viddies and warbles can be confusing for an audience when the context does […]

Read more
Reviews

The Puffs Don’t Exactly Have the Best Reputation Here…

In Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Tom Stoppard shifted the focus at Elsinore Castle from the melancholy Dane to his two school chums, hapless pawns in the battle over the crown whose deaths are so unremarkable that they are relegated to one throw-away line in a play of nearly four thousand.  In Puffs, or: Seven Increasingly Eventful […]

Read more
Reviews

If Your Face Is Twisted, It’s No Use Blaming the Mirror

The square-framed stage is divided into three rooms, two downstairs and one up, giving us the impression that we are staring into an ant farm or some kind of elaborate rodent cage.  The animals inside, a collection of inept and corrupt small-town politicians, erupt immediately into action: a government inspector is on his way from the […]

Read more
Reviews

2147

It’s 2019 and historian Gloria (Tamara Tunie) interviews Rick (James Badge Dale), a prisoner who is waiting to hear if he’s received the death penalty.  Rick was an administrator whose private prison became a death camp after Trump declared martial law and began rounding up undocumented immigrants.  Much of the play is a familiar back-and-forth, with […]

Read more
Reviews

Let’s Be Honest

Standing in front of a wall of apple carts filled with objects that will eventually be incorporated into his act, Helder Guimarães tells us that, as a child, his favorite fairy tale was “The Ugly Duckling.”  At first, the relevance is unclear.  But by the end of his rendition, the cards he has been absently shuffling […]

Read more
Reviews

Locked Doors

In his 1973 “Dispensable Foreword” to Out Cry, Tennessee Williams claims to have “the necessary arrogance to assume that a failed production of a play is not necessarily a failed play” and confesses to his “depression over the failed production.“ Williams had fair cause to feel this way—Out Cry, which took him ten years to […]

Read more
Reviews

If in the First Act You Have Hung a Pistol On the Wall…

In the winter of 1932, Hitler discovered one of his trusted colonels in the company of a thirteen-year-old boy.  He removed all but one bullet from a 9mm Luger, handed it to the man and left the room, expecting him to do the honorable thing.  But the colonel valued his own life more than Hitler’s. […]

Read more