Reviews

Starbucks!

At the beginning of the script for Slave Play, Jeremy O. Harris writes, “You should not work to make the audience comfortable with what they are witnessing at all.” True to this directive, the original production, which premiered last year at the New York Theatre Workshop, left its audience nowhere to hide. We viewed two […]

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Reviews

Surrounded by All the Things That Love Me

runboyrun and In Old Age are parts three and five, respectively, of Mfoniso Udofia’s nine-part play cycle about a single Nigerian-American family. In both works, the same house serves as the stage for an intergenerational haunting by ghosts of the Nigerian Civil War. runboyrun finds Abasiama Ufot (Patrice Johnson Chevannes) in her mid-fifties, ready to […]

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Reviews

The Birds Are Gonna Make the Wedding Bed

First things first: Hadestown is the best new musical I have seen in years.  Anaïs Mitchell’s gorgeous adaptation of the myth of Orpheus (Reeve Carney) and Euridyce (Eva Noblezada) takes its cues from folk, bluegrass, and jazz, with the band onstage and eventually introduced, one by one, by a heavy-drinking, husky-voiced Persephone (Amber Gray).  A sharply-dressed […]

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Reviews

I’m the Daughter of a Father

“In spite of what some people think, this show is actually quite carefully constructed,” Heidi Schreck says about one-third of the way into her play What the Constitution Means to Me.  Audiences might be forgiven for thinking otherwise.   What the Consitution Means to Me begins as a recreation of Schreck’s teenage years, when she would […]

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Reviews

Learn, Learn, Learn

Were it not for its anachronisms, the opening of Jeremy O. Harris’ Slave Play might read like an ugly exploitation movie from the ‘seventies.  Overseer Jim (Paul Alexander Nolan) interrupts Kaneisha (Teyonah Parris) while she’s twerking to Rihanna’s “Work” and rapes her.  Meanwhile, Alana (Annie McNamara), a bored and thirsty housewife, summons her husband’s light-skinned […]

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Reviews

That Stockholm Thing

Ayad Akhtar, whose excellent Disgraced won the Pulitzer last year and transferred to Broadway this year, is quickly becoming one of the most important (if not the most important) new voices in contemporary American theater.  His follow-up, The Invisible Hand, currently running at the New York Theatre Workshop, is thematically consistent with the last work but narratively superior, more emotionally […]

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Reviews

They Know You Exist

Caryl Churchill’s Love and Information is a solid one-hour play that happens to run for a little under two hours.  Its fifty-seven scenes are connected thematically and not narratively, featuring over one hundred characters who are all struggling with the same problem: deciding how to communicate, filter, interpret, and trust information—and, often, how that pertains […]

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