Reviews

Divisible by Three

With her slight form, her raspy voice, and her bouncy movements, April Matthis owns the stage. Playing the title character in Lydia R. Diamond’s Toni Stone, Matthis weaves effortlessly through space and time to reconstruct the story of the first woman to play professional baseball. The transitions are simple—”I’m a little girl,” Matthis will say […]

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Reviews

In the Land of Sinners, the Whore Is Queen

We begin with a lovers’ quarrel.  “Who are you writing?” Peter (Martin Csokas) barks at Chloe (Uma Thurman).  Peter’s jealousy has gotten worse recently—or maybe Chloe has changed since January.  “Give me your phone,” he demands after hearing the ding of a text.  “Once you stop trusting me,” she asks him, “what do we have left?”  […]

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Reviews

Keep the Faith

Art historian Heidi Holland (Elisabeth Moss) is a true believer.  Worse, she is “that unfortunate contradiction in terms: a serous good person.”  This means, among other things, that she is a feminist who is skeptical of the radical and divisive feminist politics in the ‘seventies but who maintains her integrity as she watches those same […]

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Reviews

It’s Time for Me to Scare You

Just because Dinner with Friends is much like every other domestic play written in the past eighty years—John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger comes especially to mind—doesn’t mean it is a bad one.  In fact, it is excellent.  Donald Margulies’ script is witty, unassuming, and quietly perceptive.  It opens at the end of a dinner party hosted by […]

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Reviews

This Is Not My Prop Gun

In July 1981, Ruth Elizabeth Davis (Carol Kane), an aging Golden Age Hollywood actress, sneaks into the home of an elderly couple in a seaside village in Maine, hiding out until after she has secured its purchase.  Her plans are slightly altered when Minnie Bodine (Mickey Sumner), a young, naïve girl—the first to admit, in […]

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Reviews

The Play About the Babies

A writer for Vanity Fair once declared that Lolita was “the only convincing love story of our century,” perhaps because he had not yet seen Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?  George (Tracy Letts) and Martha (Amy Morton) have spent a lifetime playing games—Humiliate the Host, for example, or Hump the Hostess—verbally whipping each […]

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