Reviews

There’s a War Coming, Dude

Will Arbery’s new play, Heroes of the Fourth Turning, is essentially about empathy. Two nights before the 2017 solar eclipse and five days after the murder of Heather Heyer, four young conservative Catholics, all graduates of the rigorous Transfiguration College of Wyoming, engage in a wide-ranging, late-night conversation that covers everything from Donald Trump to […]

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Reviews

We’re Getting Too Old to Fly?

Five siblings gather at their father’s (Ron Crawford) deathbed.  This is a Catholic family with typically catholic politics.  Ann (Kathleen Chalfant) is the resident liberal atheist, and while she enjoys railing against the Church, she still takes the communion “to be sociable.”  Jim (David Chandler) and Michael (Keith Reddin), both physicians, are conservatives of the […]

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Reviews

A Ribbon of Cosmic Light

“Forty years will pass in the course of a few minutes,” Hong (Brian Lee Huynh) says toward the end of The Light Years, a magical new play by Hannah Bos and Paul Thureen that is currently running at Playwrights Horizons.  Hong immigrated to the United States to work for the engineer Hillary (Erik Lochtefeld), who has been commissioned […]

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Reviews

Brush Clearing

When Louise (Carrie Coon) finds out her mother may be dying, she lies and tells her that she’s marrying her boyfriend Jonathan (William Jackson Harper).  That is, she offers fake information in order to please.  As “I shall please” is the literal meaning of the word “placebo,” Louise has given her mother a placebo wedding.  “Placebo,” as we […]

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Reviews

When You’re Here, You’re Famiglia

Despite every indication that he should try his luck in a less barren locale, chain restaurant manager Eddie (T.R. Knight) clings to his hometown of Pocatello. His franchise is failing, his family is vocally disinterested in spending time with him and his romantic prospects as a single gay man in a foundering Midwestern town are […]

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Reviews

High Resolution

“The first thing is that the audience appear to be confronted by their own reflection in a huge mirror.  Impossible.”  So begins Tom Stoppard’s The Real Inspector Hound as well as Annie Baker’s new play The Flick, which is set in a dilapidated movie theater for which the play is named, one of the eight […]

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