Reviews

What Gladsome Looks of Household Love Meet in the Ruddy Light

A Brief History of Women, the new play by Alan Ayckbourn, bears a somewhat misleading title.  It is really the history of a home, specifically Kirkbridge Manor, which between 1925 and 1985 serves a variety of purposes: as a Georgian country house, as a preparatory school, as an arts center, and finally as a hotel.  […]

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Reviews

Good Words

After an absence of seventeen years, Murray (Richard Stacey) returns home from an unnamed war, hailed by local media for his heroics during a street fight near and inside a children’s hospital.  With his young bride, the Eastern European refugee Baba (Evelyn Hoskins), he has big plans involving his father’s run-down hotel, The Bird of Prey. […]

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Reviews

Missed Connections

“Most of our lives are noise, aren’t they?” a character asks late in Alan Ayckbourn’s Confusions, a sequence of five one-act plays in which people mishear, overhear, and talk past each other.  Telephones and doorbells are left unanswered, operators fail to make connections, and microphones distort rather than amplify voices.  More often than not, conversations are glorified monologues.

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Reviews

Private Fears in Private Places

Towards the end of Arrivals & Departures, Alan Ayckbourn’s seventy-seventh play (the author is seventy-five), the military handler Ez (Elizabeth Boag) tells Barry (Kim Wall), the man she is handling, that they have nothing in common.  “We’ll never know now, will we?” Barry asks, a line that epitomizes Mr. Ayckbourn’s central concern.  In the main action of Arrivals […]

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