Reviews

Beckett: The Musical?

When he was asked why he made a shot-for-shot remake of Psycho, Gus Van Sant replied, “So that no one else would have to.”  The same could be said of Sounding Beckett, a bizarre failure of an experiment that nevertheless justifies its existence.  Six composers, working with three short plays from Samuel Beckett’s “ghost period,” […]

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Reviews

Waitin’ for Some Lover to Call

Five security guards sit around, bullshit, knit, listen to music, do crosswords, and make out—really anything but watch the wall of screens in front of them, which doesn’t seem to matter, since nothing ever happens on them anyway.  Actually, at one point, there is a B&E, but that takes place in between scenes.  What is […]

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Reviews

Let’s rehearse your song

According to a popular but apocryphal story, successful Roman military commanders returning from battle would participate in elaborate parades in which the spoils of war were flaunted before the city; however, a slave would trail the triumphant commander, repeatedly whispering in his ear—depending in the variation—either “Memento te mortalem esse” (“Remember you are mortal”) or, […]

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Reviews

What Moment Does Resurrection Choose?

The silent agony of three women living in a cavernous home in Los Angeles is suddenly interrupted by the introduction of Roscoe (Gary Cole), a Cervantes professor who is working on some sort of video project with the family’s youngest daughter, Sally (Julianne Nicholson).  The home has no patriarch—”Whitmore” left years ago—and Roscoe himself has […]

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Reviews

What We Talk About When We Talk About Sex

For those of us whose first sexual experiences took place in childhood bedrooms, high school bathrooms, and community swimming pools, the people who choose to remain abstinent seem like members of some kind of reverse freak show, where everyone is fascinatingly boring.  Just as foreign as the bearded lady or the conjoined twins is the […]

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Reviews

Venus in Stilletos

Victor L. Cahn has written a book on gender and power in the plays of Harold Pinter, and his new play, Getting the Business, feels like a riff on the issues raised in his predecessor’s work.  Billed somewhat misleadingly as a “noir farce”—probably because it features a femme fatale—it is more like a black comedy […]

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