Reviews

The Bitter Paradox of Both

In All the Way, playwright Robert Schenkkan followed LBJ through his first year in office: the accidental presidency, the landslide victory against Goldwater, and the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In its sequel, The Great Society, he picks up right where he left off: battling with Martin Luther King (Grantham Coleman) and […]

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Reviews

Call Me Deacon Blues

Wheeler (a terrific Ian Barford) is a fifty-year-old divorcée with a new apartment and old problems. Caustic and snobby, he is the kind of character that male writers have been fashioning for centuries: a failed artist and a hopeless womanizer whose self-hatred works to defuse any outside criticism. Additionally, Wheeler loathes Trump and reads Michelle […]

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Reviews

We Are Not Cold-Blooded

On the night she conceives, Serafina Delle Rose (Marisa Tomei) wakes up with a burning sensation on her breast. It was a “pain like a needle,” she tells a friend, “quick, quick, hot little stitches.” When she undresses, Serafina sees her husband’s rose tattoo on her own chest: a sign that they are going to […]

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Reviews

Starbucks!

At the beginning of the script for Slave Play, Jeremy O. Harris writes, “You should not work to make the audience comfortable with what they are witnessing at all.” True to this directive, the original production, which premiered last year at the New York Theatre Workshop, left its audience nowhere to hide. We viewed two […]

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Reviews

The Unknown Bird

The writer André (Jonathan Pryce) has recently lost his wife, Madeleine (Eileen Atkins), and appears to be losing some of his memory, too. His daughters (Amanda Drew and Lisa O’Hare) are home to sort through the house and sort through the past, hoping perhaps to convince their father to move into a retirement home. Or […]

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Reviews

What Is Essential Is Invisible to the Eye

“Please don’t mention anything that happens in the show.” This request is made by Derren Brown early in his solo magic show, Secret. While reasonable—spoilers would ruin the fun for future audiences—it puts the review in a bit of a bind: how to describe the show without mentioning anything that happens? It may be best […]

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Reviews

A Game of Squash Isn’t Simply a Game of Squash

The stage design is minimal to the extreme. More often than not, the actors speak facing outward rather than one another. When they do face each other, they stand on opposite sides of the stage, perhaps twenty feet apart. When only two are in a scene, the third remains hovering around the corners of the […]

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