Reviews

Let Us Be Sort of Your Managers with Regards to All Things Existential

At each turn, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins’ Everybody is designed to get its audience members to project themselves onto its characters.  The house lights are up about half the time, preventing us from relaxing into the darkness.  Many of the actors begin the play among us, only joining their co-stars fifteen minutes into the show as a reminder that we too […]

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Reviews

New Bottles

Everything is going to hell. Time is running out. Worry, envy and doubt creep into our thoughts and we’re all going to die. If you follow the advice dispensed by Shaina Taub and her band, the best approach is to embrace the chaos, make a mess and don’t take any of it too seriously. In Old […]

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Reviews

The Way to the Future

During the mid-sixties, the Holocaust was very much on American minds. This wasn’t always the case. At the end of World War II and the beginning of the Cold War, Germany (or West Germany) flipped from foe to friend faster than you could say Zyklon B. American Jews, hesitant to criticize this now-ally and be […]

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Reviews

You May Grow Up to Be a Fish

A.R. Gurney has a knack for writing formally inventive plays that are, ultimately, rather conservative.  Love Letters, which recently had a run on Broadway, is entirely epistolary, but the story it tells—about nostalgia, about the passage of time—is affecting but conventional.  Now the Signature is reviving What I Did Last Summer, in which many of the […]

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Reviews

What Moment Does Resurrection Choose?

The silent agony of three women living in a cavernous home in Los Angeles is suddenly interrupted by the introduction of Roscoe (Gary Cole), a Cervantes professor who is working on some sort of video project with the family’s youngest daughter, Sally (Julianne Nicholson).  The home has no patriarch—”Whitmore” left years ago—and Roscoe himself has […]

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