Reviews

Today Someone Remembered Me

Popular culture—or at least English-language popular culture—has been rather silent about the Khmer Rouge. Apart from The Killing Fields, a British film starring mostly British and American actors, there have been few onscreen attempts to reconcile with Pol Pot’s regime. Oddly, Angelina Jolie has figured in two, first as an actor and then as a […]

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Reviews

Life of a Salesman

Will Kidder (Aidan Quinn), the subject of quite a few plays by Horton Foote, is a classic American loser, the kind of naïve and disappointed optimist who has populated mid-century works by the likes of Arthur Miller, Eugene O’Neill, and Lorraine Hansberry. Will, however, has seen quite a bit of success in his life—he has […]

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Reviews

I’m Free, Tilly

Vera Stark (Jessica Frances Duke), a vaudeville alumna and now maid for “America’s little sweetie pie,” Gloria Mitchell (Jenni Barber), is desperate to elbow her way into the movies in pre-Hays Hollywood.  She asks Mitchell to recommend her to her director, but the squeaky-voiced diva is consumed by her own casting woes.  When the script […]

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Reviews

I Know This Wasn’t Much

  When writing about The Unnameable, some critics prefer to use the term “interlocutor” rather than the “narrator,” since narrator implies a subjective position that is difficult to locate in Beckett’s novel.  Indeed, while reading, it sometimes feels like the words are not being spoken so much as they are foaming out of some unknown source.

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Reviews

So How Long Since Your Last Confession?

“What kinda fuckin’ world is this?”  So begins Stephen Adly Guirgis’ Our Lady of 121st Street, with Vic (John Procaccino) screaming in his underwear in the main viewing room of the Ortiz Funeral Home.  Sister Rose is to be buried the following day, but her body has gone missing.  Thus Vic’s consternation.

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Reviews

Do You Mind if I Ask You Questions?

In 2004, nearly a half-century after its debut, Edward Albee decided to revise The Zoo Story, adding a first act that would “flesh out Peter fully.”  Without struggle and all of a sudden, Homelife “fell from my mind to the page … intact.”  The result, At Home at the Zoo, is receiving its first New York revival courtesy of […]

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