Reviews

A Very Merry War

Last year, Arin Arbus directed a wonderful Taming of the Shrew for TFANA and this season she returns with her star Maggie Siff for Much Ado About Nothing, an appropriate, complicated companion piece.  But where Shrew succeeded because it treated the text with the appropriate amount of irony, Much Ado falters because it fails to […]

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Reviews

Lord, Don’t They Help Themselves?

A night of drunken revelries on the eve of midterms finds Leigh (Zosia Mamet) in bed with Davis (Matt Lauria) while her boyfriend, Jimmy (Evan Jonigkeit), is out of town.  Leigh cries rape—and Davis, who blacked out, can’t remember—though both Leigh’s best friend, the closeted lesbian Grace (Lauren Culpepper), and Davis’ roommate, Cooper (David Hull), […]

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Reviews

With Ethan Hawke at the Helm, Unreality Bites, Too

The only interesting thing about Ethan Hawke is that no actor so lousy has tried so aggressively to trade in his celebrity for artistic credibility.  In Clive, a rewriting of Bertolt Brecht’s Baal, he plays a pretentious, narcissistic rocker with bleach-blond hair and a penchant for drinking and womanizing—quite the stretch.  And yet he can’t […]

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Reviews

I Am Not That I Play

It seems appropriate to begin Women of Will, a personal exploration of gender, sex, and power in Shakespeare, with an excerpt from The Taming of the Shrew.  But despite a lifetime of working with the Bard, Tina Packer, the show’s creator and star, gets the play thoroughly wrong.  She jokes that as a “card-carrying feminist,” […]

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Reviews

Everyone I Know Goes Away in the End

Except for the months following Columbine, it is just about the worst time in American history to stage a comedy about school shootings—and while The Amoralists are not known for their timidity, they have rewritten Collision, currently running at the Rattlestick Playwrights Theater, excising some of the jokes for the sake of decency.  It is […]

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Reviews

Naked People Have Little or No Influence on Society

In Apartheid-era Sophiatown, Philemon (William Nadylam) returns home early one afternoon to find his wife, Matilda (Nonhlanhla Kheswa), in bed with another man.  Once discovered, the man flees in his underwear, leaving behind a suit.  In a bizarre act of revenge, Philemon forces Matilda to treat the empty suit like a guest in their home—they […]

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Reviews

For Many Be Called, But Few Chosen

When you walk into the Drilling Company, a small theater on the Upper West Side, the woman who plays the title role in Miss Julie, Louise Seyffert, shuffles out of her dressing room to check your reservation.  The lobby, marked by a wheezing heater, has a few chairs, a couple of cans of coke, a […]

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