Cymbeline: Shakespeare’s Senioritis

A six-person Shakespearean production is a tricky thing to stage.  Actors and costume designers struggle with creating distinct characters, kings are executed only to reappear as rogues, and, since the small cast is often a monetary necessity, players tend to botch the language and confuse the action; the end result is the kind of stultifying mess that turns people off of Shakespeare in the first place.

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Game of Thrones

Anything but a thoroughly horrendous production of King John would be worth seeing simply by virtue of the fact that the play is unfairly under-produced: its last run on Broadway lasted for under a month back in 1915 and in almost sixty years it has only been staged four times at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival.

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Gently To Hear, Kindly to Judge, Your Play

The stage is plain and simple—a chair with some ladders and rafters—and the actors are clearly visible from the seats.  Completely dismissing the fourth wall, they walk through the audience in costume to greet friends, they joke loudly to each other backstage, and when director Jenny Bennett shows up, one theatrically bellows, “There is my directress!” My first impression of the Classical Theater of Harlem’s new production of Henry V was one of unpretentious, self-conscious perfection.  But sloppiness that first seemed premeditated and fitting became mere slop, and I, in turn, became disenchanted.

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