Reviews

We Will Be Married o’Sunday

Directors of Shakespeare’s ostensiby problematic comedy The Taming of the Shrew have long found ambiguity in that taming—recently, for example, Ann Arbis mounted a “post-feminist” revival that hewed to a more equitable vision Kate and Petruchio’s power dynamic.  It is no surprise, then, that Kiss Me, Kate should soon follow suit.  This delightful Cole Porter and […]

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Reviews

But Had Not Force to Shape It as He Would

There’s no getting around it: Joshua Jackson is a bad actor.  As James Leeds, the dashing new speech teacher at a school for the deaf, he spends most of Children of a Lesser God signing and interpreting the signs of others.  This masks a tendency to saw the air, even when the ASL doesn’t call […]

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Reviews

It’s Not My Place, It’s Where I Work

“We’ve been having the same conversation for twenty years,” Tracey (Johanna Day) complains early on in Lynn Nottage’s Sweat.  She and her friends, Cynthia (Michelle Wilson) and Jessie (Alison Wright), have worked in the same factory in Reading, Pennsylvania, since their teens.  Most of their fathers worked at the plant, too.

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Reviews

We All Need Mazel

Following Joel Grey as the Emcee in Cabaret is a bit like following Marlon Brando in A Streetcar Named Desire or, I would imagine, Mark Rylance in Jerusalem.  Mr. Grey is one of those performers who seems like he learned to entertain before he learned to crawl, and his Emcee is both attractive and repellent, with a face […]

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Reviews

Wrestling with Reality

Eldwood P. Dowd (Jim Parsons) must be the nicest character in American theater.  Within a minute of being onstage, he has enthusiastically accepted two subscriptions to Lady’s Home Journal and Good Housekeeping and invited the telemarketer over to his home.  Later, an elderly lady (Carol Kane), tells him that a Dr. McClure is having a […]

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