Reviews

Fix Me

Transformation has been the only constant of Bob Dylan’s career.  Yet there are clear strains of American mythology throughout his body of work, from his early idolization of Woody Guthrie to peak-year releases like John Wesley Harding.  It can even be found in his born again years and embrace of gospel.  In “Gotta Serve Somebody,” his […]

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News

A Hamilton for Hamilton

In a decade-old interview for The New York Times, Martin McDonagh complained about theater and accessibility.  “It’s strange to be working in an art form that costs $100 to participate in,” he said.  If his subsequent career trajectory is any indication, he now feels more at home with the egalitarianism of film.

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Reviews

Vienna Waits for You

The Elevator Repair Service is best known for their radical minimalist productions; perhaps their most famous is Gatz, an eight-hour reading of The Great Gatsby in its entirety.  I was admittedly ambivalent, then, about their Measure for Measure: would director John Collins and his cast and crew suit the text to the concept or the concept to […]

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Reviews

It’s Not My Place, It’s Where I Work

“We’ve been having the same conversation for twenty years,” Tracey (Johanna Day) complains early on in Lynn Nottage’s Sweat.  She and her friends, Cynthia (Michelle Wilson) and Jessie (Alison Wright), have worked in the same factory in Reading, Pennsylvania, since their teens.  Most of their fathers worked at the plant, too.

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Reviews

The Name Your Mother and Father Gave You

In 2003, at the end of the Second Liberian Civil War, three women wearing American hand-me-downs live in a shanty as the wives of a commanding officer for the rebel group Liberians United for Reconciliation and Democracy.  For most of Danai Gurira’s Eclipsed, they are referred to by their titles rather than their given names: Number […]

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Reviews

Old Father, New Artificer

Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home may be the best comic I have ever read.  The story of her sexual awakening, and the suicide of her closeted father, Bruce, it is not only a sophisticated rendering of a much-denigrated art, but a celebration of novel-reading as well: Alison’s life is framed by the life and art of a series […]

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News

Everything You Need to Know About Shakespeare in the Park 2014

“Like one swallow,” wrote John Simon when reviewing the premiere of The Mystery of Edwin Drood, “one Shakespeare does not make a summer.”  Fortunately, for the first time since 2011, Shakespeare in the Park is eschewing musicals for two revivals from the Bard.  This year, they are presenting Much Ado About Nothing (June 3 – July 6) and King Lear (July 22 – […]

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Reviews

Grub First, Then Ethics

“Alienation” does not always mean “unpleasantness,” and yet that is the general consensus among lousy directors of Brecht.  For these people, if it’s fun, it’s not being done right.  What a delightful revelation, then, to discover the Foundry Theatre’s Good Person of Szechwan.  This is a carnival of a production that, as the playwright dictates, is […]

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Reviews

Procure My Rise

It is a forgivable mistake to read The Comedy of Errors as an unadulterated comedy, even though it opens with the threat of execution: if Egeon (Jonathan Hadary), a merchant from Syracuse, cannot raise his ransom by five o’clock, he will be killed in accordance with the law of Ephesus, which does not allow her […]

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