Reviews

Today Someone Remembered Me

Popular culture—or at least English-language popular culture—has been rather silent about the Khmer Rouge. Apart from The Killing Fields, a British film starring mostly British and American actors, there have been few onscreen attempts to reconcile with Pol Pot’s regime. Oddly, Angelina Jolie has figured in two, first as an actor and then as a […]

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Reviews

Life of a Salesman

Will Kidder (Aidan Quinn), the subject of quite a few plays by Horton Foote, is a classic American loser, the kind of naïve and disappointed optimist who has populated mid-century works by the likes of Arthur Miller, Eugene O’Neill, and Lorraine Hansberry. Will, however, has seen quite a bit of success in his life—he has […]

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Reviews

I Have Screensavered the Forest

The premise of Dave Malloy’s Octet is terrific.  Staged as an Alcoholics Anonymous-style meeting for device addicts, a group of strangers congregate to share stories of their technological woes through song.  Jessica (Margo Seibert) admits she is the star of a viral video, “white woman goes crazy,” while Henry (Alex Gibson) cannot break the hypnotic […]

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Reviews

I’m Free, Tilly

Vera Stark (Jessica Frances Duke), a vaudeville alumna and now maid for “America’s little sweetie pie,” Gloria Mitchell (Jenni Barber), is desperate to elbow her way into the movies in pre-Hays Hollywood.  She asks Mitchell to recommend her to her director, but the squeaky-voiced diva is consumed by her own casting woes.  When the script […]

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Reviews

I Dream of Fish

Undine Barnes Calles (Cherise Boothe) is a boutique public relations executive catering to the Black bourgeoisie.  She wears gold jackets and leopard-print coats; her hair rests atop her head like a crown.  When the play opens, she is sitting behind her desk, barking orders at her assistant (Nikiya Mathis) and scrambling to find a celebrity […]

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Reviews

I Know This Wasn’t Much

  When writing about The Unnameable, some critics prefer to use the term “interlocutor” rather than the “narrator,” since narrator implies a subjective position that is difficult to locate in Beckett’s novel.  Indeed, while reading, it sometimes feels like the words are not being spoken so much as they are foaming out of some unknown source.

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